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Extra unpaid for guests

Hi there, I have a little cottage that was let to a woman this week for three nights. In the opening message to me she said “we can’t wait to stay in your cottage”, but, she’d only booked for one person (I charge extra for extra guests). So, I asked her if there were more than one person staying. She replied “my husband might stay a night or two, is that OK?”. I replied that, as I charge extra for extra guests, that she should let me know if her husband does stay. She did not let me know, and, it’s pretty obvious that he was here, although she did try to cover it up. I haven’t done her review yet. What should I do? Cheers, Lynda

How could you tell someone extra stayed and how exactly did she try and cover it up? If husband and wife presumably they slept in the same bed.

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Yes, they did. It was the washing up that was left on the sink. Also, for sure she was traveling with her husband. Why the ‘we’? Oh, and, three very large bath towels that were wringing wet. The neighbour also said (I just asked her) that there was more than one person staying. She left a few days ago (the guest)… should I ask her to clarify how many nights her husband stayed? Thanks!

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We also have the same problem very infrecuently, but it happens. We have a ring camera door bell in the front door. Photos of it are posted in our page at air as a courtesy for the guests, but yet people sometimes bring more people than expected. What we do is as follows… We set up the house supplies for the total amount of people (towels, beds, soaps, etc). If they leave the house is optimal conditions we dont complain, but we let them know what they did was just not right

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Thanks for your reply… it sounds like a good idea… but to clarify: do Airbnb allow photos to be taken?

Yes, of course they do!! Also, in the house rules now you can disclouse you have a security system in property and where it is located (inside or outside)

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The error is trying to only allow 1 to stay and then obsessing about it. That is a bad policy.

Price it for a reasonable max occupancy and stop worrying about the very normal expectation that two would come.

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Curious. I’ve been told to do the opposite: That if one person wants to stay it’s best to make it affordable for one and to add on extras for extra guess. BTW, I’m not obsessing about it. Interesting that you should say that.

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I’d just been reading how someone got kicked off of Airbnb for using a camera. Perhaps that’s because it was not a still camera, and, it was used inside? BTW, I don’t want to film my guests, however, it could be good to get a still of them entering the property.

Security cameras are allowed if you disclose them.

https://www.airbnb.com/help/article/887/what-are-airbnb-s-rules-about-security-cameras-and-other-recording-devices-in-listings

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If your typical guest count is low, but your listing supports more guests AND your market is very competitive, then having a low price for a low guest count and charging for additional guests will likely yield higher occupancy rates (and higher income). However, there are a couple of downsides you have discovered or will soon discover:

  1. Some guests will try to sneak in extra guests without paying.
  2. Some guests will give you retaliatory reviews if you catch them sneaking in extra guests and ask them to pay.
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Thanks, yes, I think I’ll just let this one go and not do anything about it. It’s happened a bit, but, it’s not a major concern, really. Most people are honest, I find. Cheers, Lynda

Exterior is OK. Right, got it, thanks.

I really don’t understand people who remote host yet have no cameras. It was one of the first things I installed and I don’t charge for extra guests. They are worth every cent for piece of mind.

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I’ve been Googling remote security cameras just now. :slight_smile:

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This is what I do for all my listings. I have been single most of my life so like to cater to singles getting a more appropriate price.

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The best way. So many of the threads here are from hosts who have a problem with extra guests, or getting money for extra guests. Price for your maximum occupancy and then you can just relax.

It’s a lot easier to give one guest a discount than monitor your rental watching for extra guests, then trying to get them to admit it and pay up. Charge a fair price for your listing, supply items such as towels and so on for that maximum and no more.

Who provides a place expecting one only? As if there are no couples, parent-child, buddies traveling together?

I would never book this place.

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Mine. And many others.

Every home has different parameters (size, for example, or bathroom access) that allow the owner to make the experience for guests the best possible. In my case, for example, a small bedroom comfortable for a single person shares a bathroom with a larger one, that ‘could’ accommodate 2. Having 4 share that bathroom was just uncomfortable, so I decided early on to limit the smaller one to a single person.

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Providing for one is not the same as only ever expecting one. However, there are Airbnbs that cater to just one. The usually have single beds or what is called (strangely) a twin in the US.

There are a lot more of “them” than there are of you.

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