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Am I just very lucky?


#21

Wow. How many rooms to you rent out?


#22

in my flat from 2011 Feb 1 room for 2 people (mostly back to back people staying between 1-4 days usually turn the room round 3 times a week - 1 room for 1 person - since 2015 our old artist studio - for 2 people and a friend from Italy’s home sleeping 5 - since this year another 3 places friends homes that are on the market that sleep 5 3 and 3- flat out - been a bit nuts -


#23

Ok, I’m a European liberal ((actually a Brit who left the UK in compete disgust over Brexit hand now living in rural Spain. I have to ask, what IS the N word?


#24

Nigger I am afraid. Not nice.


#25

And hosts can actually work this to their advantage because guests are the same. They’ll post here or on Reddit or on all those other sites asking what they should do rather than speak to the host.

So if they are making too much noise (for example) and the host goes and hammers on their door and tell them to shut the **** up, they are so astonished to see a real live person that they become wonderfully well behaved!

:slight_smile: :slight_smile: :slight_smile:


#26

Sorry guys, shouldn’t have asked … bad word!!!


#27

Oh, of course. Wish I hadn’t asked …thankfully such a long time since I’ve heard that word. Thanks


#28

Actually, nothing wrong with asking. Typing out the word Nigger is not different than typing out “N-word” - you are in essence saying the same thing. This goes back to intent. Someone was answering a question versus calling someone else on this forum that word. It’s no different than saying “I told someone to fuck off” versus “I told someone to F$%K off” - It all means the same to me…lol


#29

I agree SO much. It reminds me of people who say ‘frigging’ or some pretend word in order to avoid saying the real thing. I know exactly what they mean so why do they bother?


#30

And I have been very guilty of doing the same in forums just to follow suit so I don’t get flagged by the PC police. But really…it all means the same. Friggin means the same as fucking…whatever man. We are all adults. People who prefer to see words with symbols should probably close their eyes and get off of the internet.


#31

I have to say that - with apologies to all Americans - that people in the USA tend to be touchier (in general, as a rule, not stereotyping here!) about certain words. I’ve even seen ‘damned’ with asterisks. Because I’m English and we’re well known for swearing a LOT, I tend to get away with it in real life but it’s difficult online because I don’t type with an accent. :wink:


#32

This reminds me. USA TV censorship. I found it hilarious when I first lived in the States seeing a really graphic and pretty gross surgical operation on TV. Blood and guts all over the place. But the patient’s nipples were blurred out!

:slight_smile:


#33

I damn sure don’t take offense to your stereotyping…as that is okay with me. I actually am interested in stereotypes because they don’t come out of nowhere. I have never been offended by people who stereotype Americans as being obnoxious, uneducated, etc…because a lot of us are!

However, it is very interesting with the recent hostess thing, etc. and how Brits/UK people (what is the PC term?? lol) and how certain regions in American wouldn’t think twice about using it. It is funny how different words/terms/actions are perceived among different countries. Not limited to USA/UK. But I know since you are familiar you both…you can pick up on it right away :joy:

I think we all just need to realize that what terms are said in our own little world, aren’t the same as in the next place over…


#34

I found it to be a real culture shock when I moved over here. I’m not saying that the UK is Utopia by any means (after all, I left it to come and live here!) but I was not expecting the stereotyping that I came across. (Gay people, black people, foreigners etc. were very stereotyped and I wasn’t at all used to that). I heard phrases and words that I’d never heard before. I came across prejudices that I’d never even thought of.

I was really surprised by the way that women were perceived. It seemed as though we were back in the olden days. It was as though every woman here was like Samantha in Bewitched - a stay at home wife making herself gorgeous for when Darren came home and making sure that she made his martini just the way he liked it.

It was also interesting that I was subjected to stereotyping for the very first time in my life. For example, I was seriously affronted to realise that the city offered business grants to women-owned business - why should we need grants more than male owned businesses???

And for the first time I experienced prejudice. Literally the ‘fuck off back to your own country’ stuff. Amazing really.


#35

When I was in Spain, and living with a Spanish host. My roommate from Hong Kong and I were actually shocked that on the news they showed an up close of someone being in a car accident. Literally the picture of that person was shown all bloody, etc. and live. It was so strange. but not sure if that is the norm for Spain or they were just showing and reporting what they had seen and forwarding onto the news.


#36

This is a hot debate in America too. Some black people do not believe in affirmative action at all. They feel like that time has now passed. And they feel that minorities have been given so many opportunities to make things somewhat equal. Not saying things are equal…but not every minority in America takes the stance of being the oppressed victim. Many from those minorities speak out and say “it’s time to step it up” and you are no longer being oppressed but just making excuses. It’s 2018, not 1968.


#37

What I didn’t mention in my previous post is that in addition to offering grants for women-owned businesses, the city also had grants for minority-owned businesses.

I used to joke that maybe I could get a double grant because a) I’m a woman and b) I’m a minority. Yes, people used to say ‘they don’t mean that sort of minority’ in which case I’d play dumb and say ‘they said minority. English people are a minority here’ :slight_smile:

I found it infuriating and I can only assume that if I was black or hispanic (a ‘minority’) I’d feel the same way.

I believe that these concessions are patronising.

I don’t want - or need - anyone to think that I need special treatment because of gender or any other issues. I am me. We’re all equal, aren’t we? Ha.


#38

LOL! Or Mr and Mrs Ghastly Superho from Vancouver Canada! They will act all friendly and proclaim they are easygoing and self sufficient then proceed to slam you in a review for nitpicks and house rules that they agreed to when booking. They will also accuse you of only being interested in recycles that have deposits.


#39

Funny…I am half Hispanic but would never be thought so because I look “white” - even though my mother and grandmother came over and immigrated here. They didn’t know a word of English. Yes, I consider myself as full American. But I could also consider myself Hispanic too. I never knew what to fill out on those forms when they go around asking door to door to fill out race. It was always something like “Hispanic but not white” or some other things. I never fit. Hello…I am half Nicaraguan and half Norwegian. But I look like a Viking. So I guess I am just a white American :joy:


#40

I know what you mean about those forms! They try to classify us but real live people just don’t fit into those categories. I never know which box to check when I’m asked for my ‘race’. I guess I’m ‘Caucasian’ but I’m not sure. We’re all a pretty weird mix really. Which is just fine.


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