Toiletpaper issue

We have some guests from a few cultures that thows used toiletpaper in the toilet waste bins instead of the toilet itself.
The smell is very bad when we turn over the units.
We have a sign over the flush push button saying. "Toilet paper only. Please no sanitay pads, q-tips etc."
Anyone else experienced this? How should we deal with this in a repectful matter without offending anybody?
Thanks.

Translate your notice for the guests from these cultures would seem the easiest solution, as well as pointing this out when you/your co-host shows the guests around your listing.

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It’s not really a cultural issue, more of a plumbing/waste water infrastructure issue, and the habits people develop to manage these. Some countries have more narrow waste water pipes than others; it’s cheaper. For example, Portugal has upgraded their infrastructure since joining the EU (mostly…) but in the old days, tourists would habitually flush loo roll/tampons down the pan, the pipes would block, with raw sewage backing up and flooding the bathrooms. Not nice. Even now, notices are left about what not to flush down the loo but old habits die hard. Perhaps you could leave notices asking people to empty the bin on a daily basis?

Hi BandB, change & clean the bathroom bins every day & appreciate that your guests are not blocking your plumbing.

maybe a sign over the bin saying ‘no toilet paper, QTips and sanity pads only’

Perhaps have a sign over the toilet paper: Please dispose of toilet tissue in the toilet – not in the waste bin. [in several applicable languages or the one your guests speak.]

Also, do a simple drawing of a waste bin with a line drawn through it above the TP.

In several older buildings in places I visited in Korea, the stalls would not have any TP… you were asked to toss it in the bin, because ANY thing other than pee or poo would clog their ancient plumbing. I found this out later.

They even a
Had an intercom in the stalls that you could call in case you clogged and they would come right away before it caused a system wide disaster.

Silly me, I thought it was to tell the janitor there was no paper!

yes, sounds ideal, and add $400 to cleaning

Ooh, I need some of these! Where can you get them?
:laughing:

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Costa Rica …amd all of Central America and probably all of South America: same thing, TP goes in the bin. There are varying degrees, like in my building it can handle a certain amount so the most smelly stuff can get flushed, but not thick wads of it …but in the beach areas, you rather don’t want to experiment.
And yes, smaller pipes are the culprit and then it is just one of the things you will do almost on reflex.

And flooding and having to deal with at …so much worse.

In New Zealand I saw the opposite of sign here saying TP only in the toilet - I suppose for the many Chinese visiting. It also had an image. Perhaps I find the photo I took.

Yes, it’s a big problem here but there are signs on the back of every toilet stall door in the airports. It uses very clear images with green ticks and red crosses. I also took a picture the other day with the intention of posting it on the forum, as it struck me as a really good visual that would hopefully be interpreted the same way by everyone regardless of language or culture. I seem to have deleted the picture now though

I spent 2 months traveling in SE Asia in 2006. By the time I got back, I had a hard time remembering to throw my toilet paper INTO the toilet! :slight_smile: